Raw Camel Milk Packs a Punch of Good Health

Those who believe that raw cow milk is a healthy, nutritious food should consider raw camel milk. In the Middle East, many believe camel milk has curative powers and it is so prized that it is saved for special occasions and for when houseguests drop by.

Although camel milk is not as popular with American raw milk drinkers as cow or goat, it is starting to become available in the US – in both pasteurized and unpasteurized forms. Of those who have tried it, some strongly believe the anti-inflammatory properties of camel milk (especially unpasteurized) helps improve brain function and can help with autism. See our previous blog which details one family’s testimony, How Raw Camel Milk Helped Her Daughters.

One special type of camel milk, colostrum, is especially packed with nutrients. Colostrum is the first milk that comes out of the female camel when her baby is born, so it is extra nutritious in order to get the new baby healthy and strong as quickly as possible.

“It’s the ultimate superfood,” explains one camel milk vendor, who sells colostrum for a whopping $40 per 16oz bottle – yet sells out within a matter of hours.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  westonaprice.org/lab

Share

Maine Raw Milk Case Reaches State Supreme Court

Dan Brown, a Maine farmer who has been battling the state over raw milk regulations since 2011, is getting his day in the state’s Supreme Judicial Court.

In 2005, the Maine Department of Agriculture told Brown that he did not need a license to sell raw milk from his farm. But six years later, different officials changed that decision and instructed Brown to get a license and label his milk with consumer health warnings. Brown ignored the requirements and continued to sell raw milk from his farm, encouraged by his town’s passing of a local “food freedom” ordinance stating that small-scale farmers selling products directly to consumers are exempt from state and federal food safety requirements.

The state sued Brown, who lost at the trial court level and appealed to the state’s high court. In mid-May, Dan Brown and his attorneys appeared in Maine’s Supreme Judicial Court to argue that the trial court’s ruling was improper “…on the basis that the state is equitably estopped from requiring the license, the local ‘food freedom’ ordinance, Brown does not fit the definition of a milk distributor, and the posted warning sign means he ‘substantially complied’ with the labeling requirements.” In 33 minutes, they presented their arguments and answered questions from the justices that focused mostly on “whether the state’s interest in preventing foodborne illnesses and potential deaths is enough to override the ‘esstoppel doctrine.’’

Brown and his family are awaiting the court’s decision.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  westonaprice.org/lab

Share

Op-Ed: The Absurdity of the Raw Milk Wars

In an op-ed piece published by the Ready Nutrition blog, Marcus Flores makes a strong, logical argument for why one’s decisions about one’s health should be one’s own.

“When my father visits, he enjoys slurping down raw oysters by the dozen. I assume he knows this habit is not without a minor chance of food poisoning. While I prefer my food cooked, I do wash it down with a few beers. That is also not without its health risks,” he begins.

Flores points out that alcohol plays a role in over 10,000 deaths per year due to drunk driving, yet no state legislature is banning alcohol based on the statistics alone. Flores writes that the types of foods, substances and activities that the US government chooses to ban makes for “an extremely bizarre moral line.”

He believes that Congressman Massie’s proposed bills offers an opportunity to correct this, and that politicians and members of the public should support the bills regardless of whether they’re Republican or Democrat. Why? Because Republicans “agree that the government should play little to no role in what we ingest” and Democrats who believe in the guardianship of the State cannot possibly take seriously a government that criminalizes cheese.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  westonaprice.org/lab

Share

Louisiana Senate Upholds Raw Milk Ban

Raw milk remains banned in Louisiana after the state senate voted against a House-approved bill that would have allowed the sale of raw milk from farmers to the public.

On May 7, the Louisiana House of Representatives voted 78-19 to allow farmer-to-consumer sales of raw milk. Sales would have been limited to 500 gallons per month and the milk would have been required to carry the warning, “Consuming milk that has not been pasteurized may increase your risk of foodborne illness. Persons at highest risk include newborns and infants; the elderly; pregnant women; those taking corticosteroids, antibiotics or antacids; and those having chronic illnesses or other conditions that weaken their immunity.”

Unfortunately, this health warning wasn’t enough to convince Louisiana senators that the public has the right to decide what to eat at their own risk, like oysters.

On May 21, the Senate Health and Welfare Committee sided with public health officials and voted 4-1 against the House-approved bill.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  westonaprice.org/lab

Share

Congressman Thomas Massie Discusses Milk Freedom Act on Fox Business

On May 6, Congressman Thomas Massie appeared on the Fox Business Network show The Independents to discuss the two pieces of federal legislation he introduced that would reduce federal crackdown on raw milk.

When asked about the history of federal involvement in the raw milk industry, Massie says, “For thousands of years we’ve been consuming raw milk and in fact, Congress has never passed a law banning raw milk. What happened was, in the ’80s, …the FDA argued that it wasn’t worth their time or the energy or the taxpayers’ dollars to regulate this. They were sued and [lost] so they were basically forced by the courts to ban…the interstate transport of raw milk.”

Massie says that in Washington D.C. it is the dairy lobbyists who most vehemently oppose the bills.

“I introduced this bill with 20 co-sponsors from the left and the right and I think it took them by surprise that there are that many people that support food freedom on the Hill. It’s because we’re listening to our constituents back in our districts. You show me one congressional district that doesn’t have a large constituency of consumers that are consuming raw milk. They’re everywhere.”

Watch the full interview here: http://archive.dailypaul.com/318455

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  westonaprice.org/lab

Share