Is the FDA Falling Behind Other Countries in Raw Milk Run?

In July 2014, the United Kingdom’s Food Standards Agency released a report on raw milk that took into account the opinions of over 100 raw milk consumers. Their findings concluded that both consumers and producers “…hold a strong view…that there should be wider accessibility to raw drinking milk but this should still be managed and controlled.”

In exploring how they could take a more lenient approach to raw milk consumption in the United Kingdom, the FSA said it was open to allowing the sales of raw milk through vending machines – which would increase sales within a controlled environment.

David Gumpert, author of The Complete Patient blog, points out that this new report, in addition to New Zealand’s recent consideration of more lenient raw milk regulations, means that the FDA could quickly be becoming internationally isolated on the issue of raw milk.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

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Raw Milk in the News

When reporters make effort to understand the difference between raw milk intended for pasteurization and raw milk intended for human consumption, the interviews provide beneficial information for those seeking to make an informed choice.

Mark McAfee of Organic Pastures Dairy joined a local Canadian radio show recently to discuss the benefits of raw milk. The lively discussion includes history of raw milk regulations and differences between raw and pasteurized milk. The host asks Mark about the health benefits of raw milk for human consumption and Mark gives his expert background on the multitude of human health benefits.

This host gives an opportunity to raw milk advocate Mark McAfee to fully explore the issue.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

 

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How to Pick the Healthiest Cheeses

As one would imagine, raw milk cheese made from only a handful of basic, wholesome ingredients is superior in quality and health than pasteurized cheeses made with processed additives.

Those looking to buy only the highest quality cheeses should also keep an eye out for cheese made from pastured animals. According to a recent article, High Quality Raw Milk Cheese is Healthy, cheese made from grass-fed cows has the ideal omega-6 to omega-3 fat ratio of 2:1 whereas pasteurized cheese has a 25:1 ratio, which is already excessive in Americans’ fatty diets. Furthermore, grass-fed cheese “…is considerably higher in calcium, magnesium, beta-carotene, and vitamins A, C, D and E.”

Gouda, Brie and Edam cheese are safe bets. Read it for more tips on how to pick out the healthiest cheeses.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

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Popular Wisconsin Raw Cheese Producer Stops Production

In August, Wisconsin-based Rush Creek Reserve announced it would stop making its popular raw milk cheese, due to uncertainty over pending FDA regulations related to raw cheese.

“Food safety officials have been unpredictable, at best, in their recent treatment of soft, raw-milk cheeses, and until our industry is given clear and consistent guidance, we are forced to stop making these cheeses,” said co-owner Andy Hatch.

He added that he hoped the halt in production would be temporary, but loyal customers have already taken to Twitter to express their outrage: @cheesegeek wrote, “The premature death of Rush Creek Reserve is the canary in the coal mine for all American raw milk cheeses.”

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

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FDA bans French cheeses

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently moved to prohibit the sale of cheeses people have happily made and consumed for millennia.  The agency claims these cheeses full of healthful bacteria are too risky. They issued a ban on imports of French cheeses that exceed “FDA approved” bacteria counts.

The artisan cheese making process involves inoculating milk with select bacteria and encouraging their proliferation to make a safe and delicious product. The FDA’s move means that even such probiotic bacteria now falls under suspicion.

The rule is not new; it has been in place since 2010 but it is only now being enforced leading to the confiscation and removal of highly coveted fine French cheeses.

David Gumpert gives an excellent update and analysis on the situation on his blog.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

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New Use for Raw Milk: Artisanal Soaps

People with sensitive skin might be excited to learn that a new take on the farm-to-table trend means gentler soaps for them. In West Virginia, where raw milk sales for human consumption are prohibited, several enterprising dairy farmers have begun using raw milk as the primary ingredient in artisanal soaps.

“Goat milk soap is especially good for people with sensitive skin,” explains one marketing director for an artisanal soap company. “The pH level in goat milk is the closest to that in humans. Our formulations of essential oils, oatmeal and other ingredients keep people coming back.”

Raw milk soap sales skyrocket in the summer, when farmers can promote their products at farmers markets and fairs. However, goats are seasonal breeders and are most productive during the summer months – meaning those summer months are extra busy between milking, manufacturing and sales. Learn more about how these dairy farmers balance it all in the recent West Virginia Gazette article, Not ba-a-a-d: W.Va. goat’s milk used for soaps.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

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Raw Milk Open Barn Party Held in Vermont

In celebration of the recent change in law that now allows raw milk drinkers to pick up their milk at farmers markets, Rural Vermont and the Farm of Milk & Honey threw a Raw Milk Barn Party on Sunday, September 7, 2014.

The event was free and open to families of all ages. Attendees sipped the Farm of Milk & Honey’s creamy, delicious raw milk and nibbled on homemade cookies while musician John Holland strummed his guitar in the background. Everyone was invited to tour the barnyard and beeyard and visit the “mini farmers market” which features fresh products from local farms.

Learn more about this fun event, Raw Milk Barn Party.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

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