New Wise Traditions Podcast

Bringing you valuable information on healing and nutrient dense diets is the mission of the Wise Traditions Podcast

Wise Traditions Podcast

Wise Traditions Podcast now available for download

Our new Wise Traditions podcast is a wonderful tool to reach friends and family and even chapter members who desperately need the valuable information provided by the Weston A Price Foundation. We are already getting thousands of listeners and downloads, but there are still many people who have no idea about the healing benefits of traditional diets.

One recent episode features an interview with Charlotte Smith of Champoeg Creamery.  She is a mother of four children who suffered various health problems but found healing with raw milk.  Charlotte now has her own micro-dairy and has started helping other farmers do the same. This is another great interview offering lots of content in a common sense manner.  It’s a perfect time to get the word out about the podcast and introduce folks to the concept that food is our medicine.

Here are a few great opportunities to help your loved ones access this valuable information:

  1. If you’re a blogger, you can write about the Wise Traditions podcast and let your readers know about the easy access to life-saving information.
  2. Use FB, Twitter, Instagram, or any other social media to share how the content provided has helped you overcome chronic illness or led to a higher quality of life for you or loved ones. Come up with your own content or simply re-tweet or share what WAPF has posted.
  3. Send out a link to the Wise Traditions podcast to your email list or even your member list. Nothing beats the personal touch.

Here is some suggested wording for an email or blog post:

The Weston A. Price Foundation just launched their Wise Traditions podcast, which will make it easier than ever to share about healing through nutrition.  Every 30-minute episode of the podcast (available on itunes at the link) includes insights from all sorts of wellness experts like Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, Dr. Tom Cowan, Sally Fallon Morrell, and Joel Salatin. Or, go to iTunes and search for “Wise Traditions” under “podcasts.” If you’ve got an Android, look here for the WT podcast on Android, or search for “Wise Traditions” on Stitcher. Or simply go to the Weston A Price website to listen or download episodes. You’re going to love it!

Do you have an idea for a guest? Please share in the comments below or contact us at info@westonaprice.com

To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, visit westonaprice.org

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“I Like to Eat Whole Foods:” Why Some Tennesseans Choose Raw Milk

Despite the health risks and state law, many Tennessee residents choose to drink raw milk. In a riveting radio segment from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, reporter Michael Edward Miller investigates why.

In Tennessee, the sale of raw milk for human consumption is illegal – but consumers can legally obtain raw milk through herd shares. At one dairy farm, for example, customers pay $30 plus a monthly boarding fee to become co-owner of the farm’s five-cow herd. As co-owners they are allowed access to a share (one gallon per week) of the fresh milk.

In the segment, Miller looks at why Tennessee residents are willing to skirt the law or jump through hoops in order to have access to fresh, unpasteurized milk.

“I like to eat whole foods,” says one resident. “I like to buy my food at the farmer’s market, I like to grow my food. I am of the opinion that it’s healthier than what is provided to me by the industries.”

Raw milk drinkers emphasize the importance of knowing the cows from which they get their unpasteurized milk. Dairy farmers encourage customers to visit the farm to see how the cows graze, where they live, and the cleaning and safety measures behind the milking process. Both are quick to point out that while small, family-owned dairy farms are able to produce safe batches of unpasteurized milk, larger industrial dairies cannot. They agree with authorities that raw milk from large, commercial dairy farms is unsafe for human consumption and should not be allowed.

Listen to the complete broadcast here.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  http://www.westonaprice.org/lab

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National Farmers Union Endorsement a Huge Win for Raw Milk Advocates

In March 2013, the National Farmers Union, which represents farmers and ranchers in all states, adopted pro-raw milk policies at its 111th Annual Convention.

Delegates from California, Pennsylvania and other northeastern states called for access to raw milk for all consumers, the end to the ban on the interstate sale of raw milk, and for responsible production standards for raw milk producers – including single source production to assure that consumers know the farm and handling practices from where they buy their raw milk. During their deliberations, convention delegates heard consumer testimonials and scientific research behind raw milk consumption. They discussed the economic success of the emerging raw milk market and whether the health benefits outweighed the health risks.

By the end of the conference, the NFU had decided to move ahead with pro-raw milk policies, which is a huge step for consumers and dairy farmers alike. The sale of raw milk is still outlawed in several states, despite high consumer demand and prosperous sales from local farms in other states that are able to supply it.

Listen to an in-depth podcast about what the NFU’s decision means for the future of raw milk, how delegate Mark McAfee successfully helped to convince the NFU to endorse raw milk, and what the American Farm Bureau’s stance on raw milk is, here:

http://www.farmtoconsumer.org/news_wp/?p=6654

Read the press release here:
http://www.westonaprice.org/press/national-farmers-union-endorses-raw-milk

The Campaign for Real Milk (realmilk.com) is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation.

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