Finnish Fitness Gurus Say Processed Milk is Junk Food

Pasteurization and homogenization ruins the natural structure of milk, stripping it of many of its beneficial vitamins, fats, enzymes and bacteria. Thus the comparison that processed milk is junk food.

“Processed milk is liquid junk food. The natural structure of the milk is ruined during the processing and the body reacts to the change,” says Eeropekka Rislakki of the Eat & Joy Farmer’s Market chain in Finland. In his experience, many people whose bodies are intolerant of processed milk can drink unpasteurized milk without issue.

Finnish personal trainer Tomi Kokko is an active athlete and personal trainer used to drink up to ½ gallon of milk per day. Now that he is milk-free, he says he has more energy and gets sick less often. Kokko encourages his fitness clients to do a 2-week experiment without milk products. He claims that 95% of the people who try it don’t return to their old ways.

As in the United States, there are other nutritionists and health experts in Finland who disagree, claiming that studies show no clear evidence that raw milk is easier for the body to process than processed milk.

Whichever way you lean, it is safe to say that if you are going to drink processed milk, organic whole milk is the best option.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Modern Farmer Article Likens Goat-Sharing to Zipcar

In an interesting, playful and unique take on how to procure raw milk through herdsharding programs, Modern Farmer author Dan Nosowitz likens goat-sharing to Zipcar.

In Alaska, as in many other states across the continental US, consumers cannot legally buy raw milk as a product from farmers – but they can drink raw milk that is produced by an animal that they own. As such, some Alaskans are using goat-sharing programs as a loophole to source raw milk for themselves and their families to drink.

“It’s like Zipcar for goats, as long as you keep an incredibly liberal understanding of how Zipcar works!” writes Nosowitz.

Though not a commonly used metaphor in the raw milk debate, Nosowitz makes a point that could help those who are not as familiar with the raw milk debate better understand it. Car sharing allows people to make use of a car when they need it, without the cost or headache of the upkeep. Likewise, goat sharing allows people to reap the benefits of having a milk-producing farm animal without the responsibility of taking care of it or living and working on a farm. Herdsharing programs not only provide a loophole for raw milk drinkers, but also contribute to a sharing economy that boost sales for local producers and allow “farm to table” consumers to truly eat locally and sustainably.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Still Illegal: Raw Milk Sales in Louisiana

For a moment, it seemed like raw milk producers in Louisiana had a glimmer of hope of being able to legally sell it to eager consumers. But nope, the bill that would have allowed raw milk sales in Louisiana failed to pass the Senate Health and Welfare Committee earlier in May 2015.

Currently, it is legal for Louisiana raw milk producers to give it away but not to sell it. Senate Bill 238 would have legalized the sales of raw milk up to 500 gallons per year.

Senator Eric LaFleur, who authored the bill, likened the natural health benefits of raw milk to those of medical marijuana. “We’re going out of our way to make marijuana legal for health reasons; it seems we could do the same thing for milk,” he said.

Raw milk supporters were disappointed to hear of the failure of the bill, but optimistic at another chance next year. For now, they’ll have to continue to forgo or smuggle the raw milk in from neighboring states where sales are legal.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Now Legal to Advertise Raw Milk in Oregon

Small-scale dairy farmers and producers in Oregon can finally advertise that they sell raw milk in Oregon without fear of retribution, now that Oregon Governor Kate Brown has signed a bill that removes prohibition against advertising raw milk in Oregon.

In 2014, the state of Oregon agreed not to enforce a ban on advertising the sales of raw milk, though the advertising itself remained illegal. This year, the Oregon House of Representatives pushed through HB 2446 to “delete prohibition against advertising by unregulated producer engaged in small-scale on-premises sale of raw milk directly to consumer.” Supporters of the bill pointed out that this issue is not only about food freedom rights but also about the right to freedom of speech.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Texas House Passes Raw Milk Bill

Texas House Bill 91, a raw milk bill which would legalize the sales of raw milk in the state, has moved quickly since being approved by the House Public Health Committee on April 21, 2015. On Friday, May 8th the Texas House of Representatives approved the bill by a large majority of 103-36 vote. It now remains to be seen if the Senate will approve this bill before adjourning on June 1, 2015.

State Rep. Dan Flynn has introduced this bill in each of the 3 past legislative sessions, getting it a little farther in the legislative process each time. Flynn calls HB 91 a “free enterprise bill,” as it will empower dairy farmers to increase revenues by meeting consumer demand.

This bill faces heavy opposition in the Senate from the Texas Association of City and County Health Officials, Texas Pediatrics Society, Texas Environmental Health Association and Select Milk Producers. However, it has the support of the Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance, which has turned out members in support of the bill each time it has been introduced.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Op-Ed: How Raw Milk Advocates Can Build Momentum for Social Change

Creating social change requires hard work, dedication and lots of time; often it takes decades of outcry before others start to pay attention, and years for momentum to build before there is a spark that can sweep a nation with change like wildfire. A cultural shift happens slowly, almost imperceptibly prepping the stage for this sweeping change. But then, seemingly all at once, things have shifted and what used to be a perception or practice hailed by the few becomes adopted by many.

The question is, are there things advocates can do to build momentum more rapidly and increase their chances of sparking this change? Momentum of any cause seems to really pick up speed when the cause gains support from those who aren’t perceived to directly benefit from the change: for example, when men began to champion for women’s rights.

For raw milk advocates, this means garnering the support of non-raw milk drinkers. To appeal to the mainstream, we can’t isolate ourselves from the mainstream with divisive rhetoric or stories that sound like conspiracy theories. We need to frame this issue like a basic human right – the right to access food from the earth – and a basic freedom – the freedom to choose for ourselves which of earth’s foods we eat.

We have already seen several raw milk leaders taking this approach and doing it successfully, with more legislative “food freedom” bills up for consideration in several states across the nation. Continuing to do so will surely help us build momentum for this raw milk movement.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Raw Milk Sales Still Illegal in Montana

For a short moment, raw milk advocates in Montana thought they might have a chance at legally obtaining it from local producers. Sadly, this optimism was short lived, as the Montana State Senate rejected a bill that would have allowed owners of small herds of cows, goats or sheep to sell unpasteurized milk and milk products directly to consumers.

The Senate had a lengthy and heated debate about whether the heart of this issue came down to personal freedom or protecting public health. Eventually, the Senate deadlocked in a tie vote 25-25 and then voted to indefinitely postpone the bill. A later vote to revive the measure failed 23-25. Read more about the Montana raw milk debate here.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Highlights from an Interview with David Gumpert

Book Cover black frameIn mid-April, raw milk activist and author David Gumpert gave an interview to the Mountain Xpress in advance of a presentation and book signing about raw milk and our food system. Gumpert recently finished a successful crowdfunding campaign for a new book, The Raw Milk Answer Book.

In the interview, Gumpert discusses how he got interested in raw milk in the first place, as well as offering his opinion about why there is such much hostility towards raw milk today: “I think there are two reasons. One is historical. We did have a serious problem with raw dairy back in the 1800s and early 1900s…The diseases then were much more dangerous and often fatal – things like typhoid and tuberculosis. The diseases you can get from raw milk today are the diseases you can get from any other food…The second reason is economic.”

He also shared tips for people who want to find safe sources of raw milk and whether he thinks raw milk will be more or less accepted in the future. Read more via Mountain Xpress.

David Gumpert’s new book The Raw Milk Answer Book is now available! Support @westonaprice by buying it with this affiliate link.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Judge Rejects Final Approval of Dean Foods Settlement

In July 2014, Dairy Farmers of America (DFA) and its marketing branch Dairy Marketing Services (DMS) settled a five-year class-action lawsuit that alleged the organizations conspired with Dean Foods to manipulate unpasteurized milk prices in the Northeast, forcing farmers to join DFA or market through DMS. As part of the settlement, DFA and DMS agreed to pay $50 million to farmers affected by their manipulation.

However, a federal judge has denied final approval of the settlement, which would have worked out to an average of $4,000 paid to each of the more than 7,000 dairy farmers, in part due to the dismayed reactions of dairy farmers to the settlement. The judge said, “the financial compensation of approximately $4,000 per dairy farm was characterized as ‘functionally irrelevant,’ as it reflects the cost of one ‘tractor tire.’” (Burlington Free Press).

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share

Maine Raw Milk Bill Changes Still in Committee

A Maine bill that would allow dairy farmers to sell unpasteurized milk directly to consumers on the farm without a license is undergoing changes in committee before going to the House of Representatives for a vote.

Representative William Noon, who sponsored the bill, said that the bill needs to be refined in the Committee on Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry, but did not say when he expected the bill to go to vote. This is one of several food freedom bills the Maine State Legislature is considering in 2015.

Maine dairy farmers are divided on these bills, and not all of them believe that producers should be allowed to sell raw milk to consumers without a license. Read about some of the clashing perspectives via Concord Monitor.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

Share