Prevention Magazine Weighs Pros and Cons of Raw Milk

Prevention, a popular women’s magazine that covers a range of health and beauty topics, recently published an article weighing the risks and benefits of raw milk.

Should You Drink Raw Milk?” examines raw milk in the context of other of-the-moment health foods like kimchi, kombucha and chia seeds. The author explains to her audience what exactly is raw milk, why the CDC and FDA urge people not to drink it, what are the health benefits that raw milk advocates claim it has, and if there are any raw milk alternatives.

This is not the first time that raw milk has entered mainstream discussion through credible national outlets like The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal. While Prevention ultimately takes a middle-of-the-road position by stating raw milk is a “try at your own risk” lifestyle choice, its addition to mainstream discussion is a positive step forward for raw milk advocates wishing to spread the message of raw milk’s benefits.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

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Portlandia Pokes Fun at Raw Milk Regulations

A recent episode of popular TV show Portlandia shows characters Brendan and Michelle as they discover that raw milk is the ultimate cure for their fatigue, efficiency, aches and pains, and lackluster complexions.

“Raw milk – it’s the future!” they exclaim as they make it their mission to spread the word about raw milk and its health benefits.

Watch the hilarious Portlandia on Raw Milk clip here.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

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South Dakota Senate Passes Raw Milk Bill

The South Dakota State Senate has passed a bill that would put raw milk in the same regulatory category as Grade A milk and manufacturing-grade milk, making raw milk a legal product as it will be more easily regulated by the state.

Senate Bill 45 is the result of the hard work of a Raw Milk Work Group that was formed in February 2014 following the recommendation of the South Dakota Senate Health and Human Services Committee. The work group included Department of Agriculture Secretary Lucas Lentsch and other department representatives, dairy industry representatives, and raw milk producers and consumers. (See South Dakota Raw Milk Wins–Dakota Rural)

The passing of Senate Bill 45 means that raw milk and raw cream will be legal for sale directly to consumers (though only for delivery at farmers’ markets), through a distinct set of rules for the sale of raw milk for human consumption. Raw milk producers will still need to obtain a license and permit, must maintain sales records for notification purposes, and their facilities will still be subject to annual inspection by the Department of Agriculture.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

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Will Raw Goat’s Milk Be Legalized in Southern Nevada?

Clark County, which is located in Southern Nevada and includes the city of Las Vegas, is establishing a dairy commission to regulate the quality of raw milk products and hopefully legalize the sales of raw goat’s milk in the area.

The commission would be responsible for, “…setting the rules governing the production, distribution and sale of raw dairy products. This could include everything from setting standards on bacterial counts in milk products to overseeing investigators who test and analyze raw milk products before they’re approved for sale” (Does Las Vegas Need Milk Commission – Las Vegas Sun). The commission would be made up of a doctor, veterinarian and member of the public.

Some criticize the decision to only include goat’s milk, saying it avoids the controversy stemming from the type of raw milk that is more in-demand: raw cow’s milk. Others point out that the legalizing goat’s milk would be a promising step towards the ultimate legalization of cow’s milk.

This is not the first time that raw milk has made political headlines in Nevada. In May 2013, the Nevada Senate approved a bill to legalize the sale of raw milk in Las Vegas and across the state. This bill was ultimately vetoed by Governor Sandoval (see Nevada Senate says Yes to Raw Milk in Las Vegas).

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

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Maine Activists Optimistic for Food Rights in 2015

Despite difficulty passing measures by the Maine State Legislature to legalize raw milk and the highly publicized loss of farmer Dan Brown’s case in the Maine State Supreme Court, Mainers remain optimistic about several small food freedom bills which are being fought for in 2015.

At least three bills would legalize the sale of raw milk in some form; one bill would create a “farms-to-farmers markets” certification program; one ambitious bill would create a constitutional amendment declaring that Mainers have a “right to food.”

Representative Craig Hickman, the author of the latter, is himself a farmer and staunch proponent of food sovereignty as well as co-chairman of the Maine State Legislature’s Agriculture Committee.

“When asked Friday whether such an amendment would mean individuals have a right to buy, prepare and eat whatever food they want — whether it comes from a licensed, inspected farm or not — Hickman said he believed such an interpretation would be correct” (see Local Activists Say They’re Optimistic – Bangor Daily News).

The growing number of food-related bills moving through the legislature indicates that many Mainers see food freedom as a pressing issue and will continue to fight for it, despite the opposition they may face.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

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Wyoming House of Representatives to Vote on Food Freedom Bill

The Wyoming House of Representatives is preparing to deliver a final vote on House Bill 56, the “Wyoming Food Freedom Act,” which would legalize the sales of homegrown foods from farms directly to consumers without interference from the state.

Wyoming House Bill 56 would apply to all homemade and homegrown foods, including raw milk, eggs, jam and other commonly purchased farm goods. Essentially, this bill would, “…exempt so-called single transactions of food between the producer and any ‘informed end consumer’ from inspections, licensing and certifications by the state” (see Wyoming House Ready to Vote on Food Freedom on Food Safety News).

One of the bill’s sponsors, Representative Tyler Lindholm, points out that people all across Wyoming are already purchasing such foods from neighboring farmers and ranchers; this bill simply legalizes sales that are already happening – sales that shouldn’t be regulated by the state in the first place.

The Wyoming House Agriculture, State and Public Lands & Water Resources Committee already approved Bill 56 by an 8-1 vote in January 2015.

Realmilk.com is a consumer education project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education nonprofit based in Washington, D.C. Visit their website, westonaprice.org.

 

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Will Dubai Camel Milk Soon Be Available in the US?

In the United States, camel milk is hard to find. When you can find camel milk, it is expensive: pasteurized camel milk retails for $16 per pint.

DairyReporter.com estimates that in the US there are 18,000 cows for every camel. It is strictly illegal to import or sell camel milk in the US, as the FDA has not yet created quality standards for it.

Despite this, one large camel farm in Dubai, Camelicious, has its sights set on entering the US market with its pasteurized camel’s milk. Realmilk.com blog has previously reported on raw camel milk testimonies which give evidence of the therapeutic value of raw camel’s milk.

“Camel milk has always been known in the Middle East, but the accessibility for the wider public has been limited… Our goal is to promote the benefits of camel milk as a natural and pure resource of the region, and as a healthy alternative to cow’s milk.” says Mutasher Al Badry, the manager of business development at Al Nassma, a sister company of Camelicious that distributes fine chocolates made with camel’s milk.

Camel’s milk has 3x more Vitamin C and 10x more iron than cow’s milk; it is low in lactose and studies show that it can treat maladies like diabetes and Crohn’s disease.

Camelicious hopes, that when the time comes, it will be able to woo over American consumers with camel milk’s healthy properties in fun flavors like chocolate, strawberry, saffron, date, and original.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. Fan the Campaign for Real Milk on Facebook.

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Will Raw Milk Become a Constitutional Right in Virginia?

When the Virginia General Assembly convenes on January 14, 2015, it will consider a constitutional amendment that would guarantee the right to buy homegrown food at the farms that produce it. The amendment states, “The people shall have the right to acquire for their own consumption farm-produced food directly at the farm with agreement from the farmer who produced it.”

“Right now, you have the right to purchase food of your choice – but regulations prevent the right (of farmers) to sell them. This amendment gives consumers standing in court,” explains Lois Smith, president of the Virginia Independent Consumers and Farmers Association.

This constitutional amendment is expected to garner support from several co-signers and a Senate sponsor. If it is approved, Virginia would be the first state to pass such an amendment.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. Fan the Campaign for Real Milk on Facebook.

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Raw Milk Might Not Have Been Cause of Durand Football Team Falling Sick

In September 2014, dozens of players of the Durand, WI football team fell sick following a team dinner. Health officials concluded the outbreak was due to the consumption of unpasteurized milk. Now, however, there’s reason to believe that the milk might not have been the cause of the illness afterall.

“Some people got sick who didn’t drink the milk,” says Diana Reed, whose farm supplied the milk.


According to the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, a total of 38 people fell ill following the team dinner and 26 of those illnesses stemmed from the bacteria Campylobacter jejuni. This same strain of bacteria was found in some of the manure of the cows at Reed’s farm.

However, Reed points out that Campylobacter is commonly found in all cows in Wisconsin and no Campylobacter was found in the farm’s bulk tank, which was tested 6 days after the outbreak.


Furthermore, this particular strain of Campylobacter is also found in chicken, which was also served at the team dinner. At the dinner, 56 people ate chicken and 38 got sick; 43 people drank the milk and 33 got sick. This leaves 5 people who did not drink the milk but still had Campylobacter.

“We’ve had four boys in football in Durand through the last eight years. I’ve lived and breathed Durand football. This was the last thing I would ever want to be involved in – making a football team sick,” says Reed.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. Fan the Campaign for Real Milk on Facebook.

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Wisconsin Supreme Court Rejects Hershberger’s Appeal

In December 2014, the Wisconsin Supreme Court rejected Vernon Hershberger’s appeal over his 2013 conviction for violating a holding order on the sales of raw milk from his farm.Hershberger had been cleared of all other charges in the case. His attorney’s were appealing the final charge to clear his name.

The Fourth District Court of Appeals also denied hearing the case this summer. The Supreme Justices did not provide a reason for why they denied the appeal.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. Fan the Campaign for Real Milk on Facebook.

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