Milk a Terrorism Threat?

As part of the Food Safety Modernization Act, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed an “intentional adulteration rule” which requires that domestic and foreign food facilities address risks of contamination that could occur by intentional acts of terrorism.

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) has asked the FDA that dairy farms be exempted from the intentional adulteration rule, arguing that because pasteurized milk goes through so many processing steps it would be a poor choice for intentional adulteration.

“In considering whether activities that occur on dairy farms represent a high risk for intentional adulteration, FDA concluded fluid milk storage and loading in a dairy farm operation pose a significant vulnerability,” wrote Beth Briczinski, the Vice President of Dairy Foods and Nutrition at the NMPF. “However, for a number of reasons, we disagree with the premise that on-farm milk destined for pasteurization is a high-risk food and, therefore, we maintain that activities on dairy farms should not be addressed through this rule.”

“Raw milk that is produced for direct human consumption and not destined for pasteurization should not be exempted,” NMPF noted.

NMPF also submitted comments to the FDA in conjunction with the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) arguing that food defense and food safety should be regulated differently. The deadline for the FDA to issue its final ruling in response to these comments is May 31, 2016.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  westonaprice.org/lab

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Washington Times Op-Ed: Congress Steps in to Call Off the War on Unpasteurized Milk

An editorial published in The Washington Times paints a vivid picture of the legal disputes between raw milk sellers and public health officials, describing it as a “war on unpasteurized milk” in which several members of Congress have finally and rightfully decided to intervene.

The author portrays authorities as “food police” and describes undercover agents trying to entrap Amish farmers and SWAT teams raiding health food markets in attempts to crack down on the sales of raw milk. The author praises Representative Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Representative Chellie Pingree (D-ME) for introducing two food freedom bills that would end federal persecution of those selling and buying raw milk and raw milk products.

“It’s a sure sign that the government is too big and has too much to do that it expends so much effort to spill raw milk,” writes the author. “The public is perfectly capable of deciding whether to drink milk raw or cooked. The SWAT teams should look for evildoers elsewhere.”

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  westonaprice.org/lab

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Milk Is the Most Reported Undeclared Allergen in the Third Annual Reportable Food Registry Report

In May 2013, the FDA released its third annual Reportable Food Registry Report, for the twelve months ending September 27, 2012. The FDA requires food companies to inform the agency about any foods that have been manufactured and released for sale that have a reasonable probability of being hazardous to human health (“reportable foods”). Once identified, the FDA works with growers and manufacturers to reduce the risk of harm. The Reportable Food Registry is an invaluable tool for maintaining a safe food supply. Continue reading

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