A Recluse Milkman Makes the Rounds

Every Tuesday in the tiny town of Recluse, Wyoming, a milkman makes his rounds. He might not dress the part of the classic American milkman from days gone by, but he delivers fresh, raw milk in glass half-gallon jars to neighbors all across the area.

These neighbors are regular customers of his; each owns a share of a cow in his herd of 17 dairy cows. Wyoming allows the sale of raw milk only through herdshares, but this dairyman isn’t only in the business for the money:

“It’s great pleasure to see some of these kids, some of them are suffering from things like autism and things like that where the enzymes and the good proteins and the good nourishment in this milk is actually helping some of these kids. I’ve had people who are recovering from cancer start to drink this milk, and they’re actually gaining a little weight. Those kinds of things feel really good…It’s not about the money; it’s about providing good, wholesome food.”

Read more of his story Modern Milkman.

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the Weston A. Price Foundation, a nutrition education non-profit based in Washington, D.C. To learn more about raw milk and other nutrient dense foods, attend one of the upcoming Wise Traditions conferences.

Share

Cow-Share Programs Under Scrutiny in Australia

The May 2013 raid of a dairy farm in Willunga Hill, Australia is another battle in the war between consumer choice and public health that is taking place all over the world.

In Australia, the sales of raw milk and raw milk cheeses for human consumption are illegal. Officers of the Biosecurity SA and the Dairy Authority of South Australia raided Mark Tyler’s dairy farm in May because they want him to register his cow-share program, which provides raw milk to share owners. Tyler refuses to do so, claiming that his operation is a legal way for shareholders to acquire raw milk as farmers and other cow owners are legally permitted to consume the milk that their cows produce.

Tyler’s “My Cow” cow-share program allows consumers to purchase a 1% share of a cow for $27.50, in addition to a monthly boarding fee. Each share yields 6.5 liters of raw milk every month. The program has been in operation for six years.

This raid and pressure from authorities has, once again, raised the issue of whether cow-share programs should be considered a means of selling raw milk to the general public – and whether raw milk sales should be illegal at all. Raw milk sales are legal in many countries, including New Zealand.

Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) is investigating the processing and consumption of raw milk products, and there is strong opinion in support of consumer choice. Should raw milk sales be allowed, cow-share programs like Tyler’s would be subject to official quality standards which, to many, seems like a good compromise between those who believe in consumer freedom and those who act in the interest of public safety.

Read more about the issue here:

http://www.altlj.org/news-and-views/downunderallover/duao-vol-38-3/605-raw-milk-raid-at-willunga-hill-enforcing-food-safetyhttp://www.altlj.org/news-and-views/downunderallover/duao-vol-38-3/605-raw-milk-raid-at-willunga-hill-enforcing-food-safety

The Campaign for Real Milk is a project of the nutrition education non-profit, The Weston A. Price Foundation. Donate to help fund research into the benefits of nutrient dense foods.  http://www.westonaprice.org/lab

Share

Families Suffer in West Virginia because of State’s Raw Milk Ban

Many families in West Virginia are suffering because of the state’s ban on raw milk sales. There is the 11-year old child who is allergic to the pasteurized milk sold in grocery stores, but her mother is unable to purchase raw goat’s milk from local farms. There is the family who missing out on an estimated $20,000 per year because they are unable to sell the extra milk produced by their two dairy cows. Continue reading

Share